Coming Soon! Get your PDF maps to bicycle Gettysburg

Sep 20, 2018 by Sue Thibodeau , in News and Notes
Are you an adventurous, open-minded person who learns by doing? If you enjoy learning about American history, especially the U.S. Civil War, then I would argue that there is no better way to learn about the Battle of Gettysburg than to tour on a bicycle.

To this day, the three day Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863) produced the greatest loss of life in the history the Western Hemisphere. About 25 miles of park avenues wind through the fields, wood lots, and hills of Gettysburg National Military Park, which in over 6,000 acres, greets visitors with more than 3,000 monuments and markers -- all of which make Gettysburg, Pennsylvania home to the largest outdoor sculpture garden in the world.

Gettysburg's natural and physical landscape tells the story of the Battle of Gettysburg in a way that bicyclists are inclined to understand, because the lessons of history speak to our active minds and bodies through the experience of bicycling the battlefield. 

To bicycle the park, you need to be healthy enough to keep your balance on a bicycle and to pedal for a few miles. Yes, there are some modest (even steep) hills in Gettysburg, but you can walk your bicycle if need be. Afterall, there are so many opportunities to read wayside exhibits or enjoy viewing a sculpture that you will be walking some anyway. In other words, historical touring on a bicycle is not a performance sport. If you ride to your capabilities (or preferences), then bicycling Gettysburg National Military Park is an option for you.

Since 2012, I have traveled from Upstate New York for multi-day trips to Gettysburg. I drive seven hours south, park my car in a hotel parking lot, and spend a few days bicycling and walking. It took a few years, but in the process of documenting my bicycle routes, I realized that I had a book in me. When the book became too large, I decided to let the book focus on a full day route (of 23.8 miles) through Gettysburg National Military Park, with equal attention to bicycling and historical topics. Since I had thirteen additional bicycle routes that I wanted to share, these are now published in digital (PDF) form as companion maps.

In October 2018, my goal is to offer a series of reasonably priced PDF maps for sale and download. I hope that you will visit this website again and look for opportunities to get your copies for a trip to Gettysburg next year! In the meantime, please visit https://www.civilwarcycling.com for free educational materials.

Best Regards,
Sue Thibodeau